The Subtle Decadence of My Pijama Collection

Finally.

For the last few weeks I’ve gotten a bunch of emails about my series called “these look just like boxers” (see Here, Here, Hereand Here). I was sort of ambiguous about why they looked just like boxers even if they obviously were. Well they are boxers, and then, again, they aren’t. Indeed while J. Crew and the like sell these as boxers, I use them to sleep in. I can’t explain it. It makes no sense, but there’s something I really love about going to bed like some turn of the century, hotel-particular-living decadent wealthy poet. It’s a cheap habit to maintain (especially when they’re on sale). So here, I present you with my Pijama collection (yes, I know that’s not how it’s spelled anymore, but then again I’m not in kindergarden). For the longest time I would sleep in my boxer briefs, and eventually I got tired of it. Nobody really has sleepwear anymore that isn’t repurposed sportswear or day old underwear, or those long billowy pajamas people wear with flip flops in high school on free dress days. Luckily, when I go into stores and I get boxers to sleep in, I don’t ever really see them as boxers, but as my Pijamas. So without any more explanation, here is my collection.

Here is one of my favorites. They’re an old LL Bean, Normal Rockwell like print of a New England hunter, on an olive green poplin. To say the least, they’re very comfortable. 

 Some green Paisleys:

Pink end-on-end on Blue Polka Dots:

The Essential: Part III

Flat waxed cotton laces from Italy, in a wealth of colors. I like these because they’re not like Benjos or the others. These are actual dress laces, and the colors further obfuscate any line between casual and dress. These are more than a splash of color, they’re a way of making the shoe foppishly elegant in a way that is entirely uncommon. These are made by Strupai. (A post on the ones I own, soon). 

Smurf striped socks, featuring papa smurf. 

Smurf striped socks, featuring papa smurf. 

The Tale of A Belt

About two years ago I ordered myself some leather and crafter a belt. I came up with a dye and made the right levels of product, I burnished and waxed the edges, and I wore it. It was a bit too thick to be my dress belt, but whenever I wasn’t wearing a dress shirt, I was wearing this. Here is what it looked like new.image

It was a really gorgeous dark London tan. Orange, and inspired by a Tanner Goods belt I had bought months earlier. After two years of use this is what it looks like now. 

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I’ve added a second keeper that was made from leather lace. I had to cut a second hole (which I did with an Opinel knife instead of with a leather punch). You can see it’s gotten much darker, too. The brass is dull and scratched. imageIt’s full of wrinkles, especially near the end. This is where, one afternoon a year or so ago, I got bored and etched some squares along 4 inches of the belt with the same Opinel knife. The squares have changed a lot too. 

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Below are a few more photosimage

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The Essential: Part II

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A durable leather belt, this one by Equus made in the UK. You need a belt you can wear with jeans and a t-shirt, and with a jacket and broadcloth shirt. A suit, now that’s another question, but this one with nickel hardware in London Tan bridle leather will serve elegantly for almost any occasion.  

Horween

A rather hot commodity of late is the name Horween. Anything associated with the leather curriers from Chicago is in demand, in vogue, and usually extremely expensive. I’m certain that it started with Alden—the shoemakers who use Horween, and in particular their Shell Cordovan and Chromexcel. If you do some proverbial archaeological digging, you can find that around 4 years ago J. Crew started selling a version of the Alden Indy. As the store blew up and became, for better or worse, one of the biggest names in men’s clothing, so did the name Alden. As a result, the internet lit up with the leather Indy Boots are made of—Horween Chromexcel. There are makers like Leffot, Haberdash, and Makr make belts and various leather goods from Chromexcel, but the price isn’t right for many of us. We’d love a Horween belt, but can we justify it? I’ve done some looking and I’ve found a few places that have rather inexpensive Horween leather goods.

The first is the Duluth Trading Company

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It’s a rather thick leather belt, but at $39.50, it’s about half the going rate for belts made of similar leather. 

Read More

Episode IV: These Look Just Like Boxers…
I mean it, an explanation to come soon…

Episode IV: These Look Just Like Boxers…

I mean it, an explanation to come soon…

The Essential: Part I

This week I’m starting a new series called “The Essential.” I realize there are a countless things I own and that I’ve spent a good amount of time collecting, researching, and finally putting to good use. They’re the foundation of my style, and more often, of my life. I’m always building on this collection and so, every week, I’m going to post one item that I endorse, and that I consider completely essential. Perhaps most importantly, they’ll be items that won’t entirely drain your funds or that are needlessly expensive. 

This week, it’s the Jack Spade Mill Leather Wallet

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It’s simple, but the color is bold. It’s functional, practical, and if you need to carry a wallet every day, it should be one you’re happy to take out of your pocket. 

A rather nice surprise this morning…
Handed to me on my way in to work. 
Partially seen and unseen: Blue End on End shirt, puppy tooth Linen SC, green Polo knit tie, raw 511’s, and black chelsea boots.

A rather nice surprise this morning…

Handed to me on my way in to work. 

Partially seen and unseen: Blue End on End shirt, puppy tooth Linen SC, green Polo knit tie, raw 511’s, and black chelsea boots.

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